Report from AECT 2019

Last month, I had a busy-but-fun time at AECT 2019. I definitely took too much on during this conference, but I’m happy with how things went, and I continue to be grateful for the supportive AECT community. Here’s a brief list of the presentations I gave and links to some of the associated materials.

Greenhalgh, S. P., Huang, K., & Rosenberg, J. M. (2019, October). Understanding gaming communities and exploring learning opportunities: A computational grounded theory approach. Paper presented at the meeting of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology International Convention, Las Vegas, NV.

Abstract:

Games support different kinds of learning, and what a player is learning is an important question. Examining gaming communities affords insight into this question but poses methodological challenges. In this study, we evaluate an innovative methodological approach, computational text analysis, by exploring what members of the Eco gaming community are discussing and what implications that may have for learning. We found that player discussions centered in four areas, three of which had possible connections to learning.

Slides

Greenhalgh, S. P., Nnagboro, C., Kaufmann, R., & Gretter, S. (2019, October). Academic, social, and cultural learning in the #bac2018 Twitter hashtag. Paper presented at the meeting of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology International Convention, Las Vegas, NV.

Abstract:

We examined academic, social, and cultural activity in the Twitter hashtag for the 2018 French baccalauréat exam. Because the baccalauréat is socially and culturally significant in France, this activity demonstrated how learning and culture co-exist in online learning spaces. Participants used Twitter for academic learning (e.g., sharing class notes), social learning (e.g., empathizing with other students), and cultural learning (e.g., commenting on the history of the baccalauréat).

Slides

Greenhalgh, S. P., Staudt Willet, K. B., & Koehler, M. J. (2019, October). Twitter hashtags and religious learning: Mormon identity and participatory practice in #ldsconf. Paper presented at the meeting of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology International Convention, Las Vegas, NV.

Abstract:

Technology increasingly influences the acquisition and expression of religious identities and practices. In this study, we explore how one Mormon religious practice (“sustaining”) is enacted differently in the #ldsconf Twitter hashtag than in traditional Mormon contexts. Our results suggest that although #ldsconf participants largely respected the established intention and importance of sustaining, they were able to express themselves more personally with Twitter than they could have in traditional spaces.

Slides

Neumann, K., Lu, Y.-H., Ding, A.-C., Moore, R., & Greenhalgh, S. P., (2019, October). New faculty inspired by mentors at AECT’s Early Career Symposium. Panel presented at the meeting of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology International Convention, Las Vegas, NV.

Abstract:

This panel presents the experiences of five scholars who were selected to participate in the 2018 Early Career Symposium in Kansas City. The panelists will discuss the most important and impactful takeaways from their participation in the symposium before revealing how their professional work has been influenced since participating in the symposium. The panel will engage the audience by soliciting questions and offering responses, clarifying statements, and/or additional detail.

Slides

Staudt Willet, K. B., Greenhalgh, S. P., & Rosenberg, J. M. (2019, October). Online data and open source tools: Analyzing educational internet data using R, Association for Educational Communications and Technology, Las Vegas, NV.

Abstract:

In this workshop, we help participants to learn how to use the R statistical software to analyze Internet data that is relevant to educational research. In particular, we on learning how to get started with R, how to analyze social media data from an already-completed project and beginning one’s own analysis. This workshop promises to support participants to become more confident in their ability to engage in analyzing complex data sources collected from digital sources.

GitHub Repository