🔗 linkblog: my thoughts on 'Why We're Dropping Basecamp - Duke University Libraries Blogs'

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Lots to appreciate in this post. link to “Why We’re Dropping Basecamp - Duke University Libraries Blogs”

🔗 linkblog: my thoughts on 'Anarchist Chess - Existential Comics'

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What I like about this comic is the way it shows that we build values we don’t agree with into games because games are more fun with conflict. link to “Anarchist Chess - Existential Comics”

is the Mistborn Adventure Game the ethics TTRPG I've been looking for?

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Twice this month already I’ve written about whether and how to try to play according to one’s values in games. Both posts have been inspired by Lotus Dimension, a TTRPG that explicitly encourages finding nonviolent solutions to in-game problems. In my first post, I expressed interest in the game because it “allow[s] and encourage[s] other paths to vidtory.” In my second, though, I wondered whether that were good enough: “Is ethical behavior in a game because the system of the game rewards that behavior truly ethical?

🔗linkblog: my thoughts on 'Why Do Video Games Want Me to Be a War Criminal: WIRED'

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Some interesting writing on a topic I’ve posted about a few times recently. link to ‘Why Do Video Games Want Me to Be a War Criminal

more unfinished thoughts on games and living one's values

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A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about buying a copy of Lotus Dimension, an indie TTRPG that encourages players to find non-violent solutions to problems. I haven’t made my way through the whole rulebook yet—I’ve been busy, and frankly, it’s a bit dense. It’s a bit crunchier than I would have expected from an indie TTRPG focused on an interesting premise, and I’m frankly not sure if it will live up to my initial excitement.

unfinished thoughts on games and living one's values

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After several years of having it vaguely on my wish list (ever since Cory Doctorow’s post about it on Boing Boing), I finally picked up a copy of Lotus Dimension, a tabletop roleplaying game with an intentional emphasis on resolving problems through non-violence. I’ve been reading a lot on non-violence lately, and even though I still have a lot to learn, I’ve been asking recently whether a commitment to non-violence in real life would be incompatible with enjoying games where violence is one of the key ways to achieve victory.

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Microsoft Word spellcheck (set to U.S. English) is offering the English “television” and the Spanish “televisión” as corrections to the French “télévision” in my manuscript. Great example of algorithmic values.